Supramaximal intermittent running performance in relation to age and locomotor profile in highly-trained young soccer players

[OP-PM17] 08.07.2011 Buchheit - HIGH-INTENSITY INTERMITTENT RUNNING PERFORMANCE

ECSS 2011 – Buchheit – HIGH-INTENSITY INTERMITTENT RUNNING PERFORMANCE

J Sports Sci. 2013 Jun 28. [Epub ahead of print]

Supramaximal intermittent running performance in relation to age and locomotor profile in highly-trained young soccer players.

Source

a Aspire, Academy for Sports Excellence , Football Performance and Science Department , Doha , Qatar.

Abstract

Abstract The aim of the study was to examine supramaximal intermittent running performance in highly-trained young soccer players, with regard to age and locomotor profile. Twenty-seven Under 14, 19 U16 and 16 U18 highly-trained soccer players performed an incremental intermittent running test (30-15 Intermittent Fitness Test) to assess supramaximal intermittent running performance (VIFT), an incremental running test to estimate maximal aerobic speed (VVam-Eval) and a 40-m sprint to estimate maximal sprinting speed (MSS). U16 and U18 presented very likely greater VIFT (19.2 ± 0.9, 19.7 ± 1.0 vs. 17.4 ± 0.9 km · h-1) and VVam-Eval (16.2 ± 0.9, 16.7 ± 1.0 vs. 14.6 ± 0.9 km · h-1) than U14, while there was no clear difference between U16 and U18. MSS (25.1 ± 1.6, 29.3 ± 1.6 and 31.0 ± 1.1 km · h-1 for U14, U16 and U18) was very likely different between all groups. When data were pooled together, VIFT was very largely correlated with VVam-Eval and MSS (overall r =0.89, partial r = 0.74 and 0.29, respectively). Within-age group correlations showed that the older the players, the greater the magnitude of the correlations between VIFT and VVam-Eval (r = 0.67, 0.73 and 0.87). In conclusion, the major predictors of VIFT were, in order of importance, VVam-Eval and MSS; however, the older the players, the greater the correlations with VVam-Eval.

Post-match Recovery in Youth Soccer player

J Sports Sci. 2011 Mar;29(6):591-8. doi: 10.1080/02640414.2010.546424.

Effects of age and spa treatment on match running performance over two consecutive games in highly trained young soccer players.

Source

Physiology Unit, Sports Science Department, ASPIRE, Academy for Sports Excellence, Doha, Qatar. martin.buchheit@aspire.qa

Abstract

The aim of this study was to examine the effect of age and spa treatment (i.e. combined sauna, cold water immersion, and jacuzzi) on match running performance over two consecutive matches in highly trained young soccer players. Fifteen pre- (age 12.8 ± 0.6 years) and 13 post- (15.9 ± 1 y) peak height velocity (PHV) players played two matches (Matches 1 and 2) within 48 h against the same opposition, with no specific between-match recovery intervention (control). Five post-PHV players also completed another set of two consecutive matches, with spa treatment implemented after the first match. Match running performance was assessed using a global positioning system with very-high-intensity running (> 16.1-19.0 km · h(-1)), sprinting distance (>19 km · h(-1)), and peak match speed determined. Match 2 very-high-intensity running was “possibly” impaired in post-PHV players (-9 ± 33%; ± 90% confidence limits), whereas it was “very likely” improved for the pre-PHV players (+27 ± 22%). The spa treatment had a beneficial impact on Match 2 running performance, with a “likely” rating for sprinting distance (+30 ± 67%) and “almost certain” for peak match speed (+6.4 ± 3%). The results suggest that spa treatment is an effective recovery intervention for post-PHV players, while its value in pre-PHV players is questionable.

Repeated high-intensity activities during youth soccer games in relation to changes in maximal sprinting and aerobic speed

 Buchheit -  Changes in Fitness and game RSA (Small)

pdf: Buchheit – Changes in Fitness and game RSA

Int J Sports Med. 2013 Jan;34(1):40-8. doi: 10.1055/s-0032-1316363. Epub 2012 Aug 15.

Repeated high-speed activities during youth soccer games in relation to changes in maximal sprinting and aerobic speeds.

Source

ASPIRE, Academy for Sports Excellence, Sport Science, Doha, Qatar. martin.buchheit@aspire.qa

Abstract

The aim of this study was to examine in highly-trained young soccer players whether substantial changes in either maximal sprinting speed (MSS) or maximal aerobic speed (as inferred from peak incremental test speed, V(Vam-Eval)) can affect repeated high-intensity running during games. Data from 33 players (14.5±1.3 years), who presented substantial changes in either MSS or V(Vam-Eval) throughout 2 consecutive testing periods (~3 months) were included in the final analysis. For each player, time-motion analyses were performed using a global positioning system (1-Hz) during 2-10 international club games played within 1-2 months from/to each testing period of interest (n for game analyzed=109, player-games=393, games per player per period=4±2). Sprint activities were defined as at least a 1-s run at intensities higher than 61% of individual MSS. Repeated-sprint sequences (RSS) were defined as a minimum of 2 consecutive sprints interspersed with a maximum of 60 s of recovery. Improvements in both MSS and V(Vam-Eval) were likely associated with a decreased RSS occurrence, but in some positions only (e. g., - 24% vs. - 3% for improvements in MSS in strikers vs. midfielders, respectively). The changes in the number of sprints per RSS were less clear but also position-dependent, e. g., +7 to +12% for full-backs and wingers, - 5 to - 7% for centre-backs and midfielders. In developing soccer players, changes in repeated-sprint activity during games do not necessarily match those in physical fitness. Game tactical and strategic requirements are likely to modulate on-field players’ activity patterns independently (at least partially) of players’ physical capacities.

Monitoring fitness in Football with the 5-5 test

Video

Buchheit - Monitoring changes...

Oral presentation @ the World Congress on Science & Football

pdf: Buchheit – Monitoring changes… (WCSF 2011)

Eur J Appl Physiol. 2010 Jul;109(5):869-78. doi: 10.1007/s00421-010-1422-x. Epub 2010 Mar 14.

Determinants of the variability of heart rate measures during a competitive period in young soccer players.

Source

Performance Enhancement and Talent Identification Section, ASPIRE, Academy for Sports Excellence, P.O. Box 22287, Doha, Qatar. martin.buchheit@aspire.qa

Abstract

Measurements of exercise heart rate (HR(ex)), HR recovery (HRR) and HR variability (HRV) are used as indices of training status. However, the day-to-day variability of these indices throughout a competitive soccer period is unknown. On 14 occasions during a 3-week competition camp, 18 under 15 (U15) and 15 under 17 (U17) years soccer players performed a 5-min submaximal run, followed by a seated 5-min recovery period. HR(ex) was determined during the last 30 s of exercise, while HRR and HRV were measured during the first and last 3 min of the post-exercise recovery period, respectively. U15 players displayed greater HR(ex) (P = 0.02) and HRR (P = 0.004) compared with the U17 players, but there was no difference in HRV (P = 0.74). The mean coefficient of variation (CV) for HR(ex) was lower than that for HRV [3.4 (90% CL, 3.1, 3.7) vs. 10.7 (9.6, 11.9)%, P < 0.001]; both were lower than that for HRR [13.3 (12.2, 14.3)%, P < 0.01]. In contrast to HR(ex) and HRR, the CV for HRV was correlated to maximal aerobic speed (r = -0.52, P = 0.002). There was no correlation between total activity time (training sessions + matches) and CV of any of the quantified variables. The variability of each of these measures and player fitness levels should be considered when interpreting changes in training status.

Eur J Appl Physiol. 2012 Feb;112(2):711-23. doi: 10.1007/s00421-011-2014-0. Epub 2011 Jun 9.

Monitoring changes in physical performance with heart rate measures in young soccer players.

Source

Physiology Unit, Sport Science Department, ASPIRE Academy for Sports Excellence, P.O. Box 22287, Doha, Qatar. martin.buchheit@aspire.qa

Abstract

The aim of the present study was to verify the validity of using exercise heart rate (HRex), HR recovery (HRR) and post-exercise HR variability (HRV) during and after a submaximal running test to predict changes in physical performance over an entire competitive season in highly trained young soccer players. Sixty-five complete data sets were analyzed comparing two consecutive testing sessions (3-4 months apart) collected on 46 players (age 15.1 ± 1.5 years). Physical performance tests included a 5-min run at 9 km h(-1) followed by a seated 5-min recovery period to measure HRex, HRR and HRV, a counter movement jump, acceleration and maximal sprinting speed obtained during a 40-m sprint with 10-m splits, repeated-sprint performance and an incremental running test to estimate maximal cardiorespiratory function (end test velocity V (Vam-Eval)). Possible changes in physical performance were examined for the players presenting a substantial change in HR measures over two consecutive testing sessions (greater than 3, 13 and 10% for HRex, HRR and HRV, respectively). A decrease in HRex or increase in HRV was associated with likely improvements in V (Vam-Eval); opposite changes led to unclear changes in V (Vam-Eval). Moderate relationships were also found between individual changes in HRR and sprint [r = 0.39, 90% CL (0.07;0.64)] and repeated-sprint performance [r = -0.38 (-0.05;-0.64)]. To conclude, while monitoring HRex and HRV was effective in tracking improvements in V (Vam-Eval), changes in HRR were moderately associated with changes in (repeated-)sprint performance. The present data also question the use of HRex and HRV as systematic markers of physical performance decrements in youth soccer players.

Match running performance and physical capacity in youth soccer

Matchrunningsoccer_Page_01

pdf: Buchheit – Match running performance and physical capacity in youth football (soccer)

Int J Sports Med. 2010 Nov;31(11):818-25. doi: 10.1055/s-0030-1262838. Epub 2010 Aug 11.

Match running performance and fitness in youth soccer.

Source

Physiology Unit, Sport Science Department, ASPIRE, Academy for Sports Excellence, Doha, Qatar. martin.buchheit@aspire.qa

Abstract

The activity profiles of highly trained young soccer players were examined in relation to age, playing position and physical capacity. Time-motion analyses (global positioning system) were performed on 77 (U13-U18; fullbacks [FB], centre-backs [CB], midfielders [MD], wide midfielders [W], second strikers [2 (nd)S] and strikers [S]) during 42 international club games. Total distance covered (TD) and very high-intensity activities (VHIA; >16.1 km·h (-1)) were computed during 186 entire player-matches. Physical capacity was assessed via field test measures (e. g., peak running speed during an incremental field test, VVam-eval). Match running performance showed an increasing trend with age ( P<0.001, partial eta-squared (η (2)): 0.20-0.45). When adjusted for age and individual playing time, match running performance was position-dependent ( P<0.001, η (2): 0.13-0.40). MD covered the greater TD; CB the lowest ( P<0.05). Distance for VHIA was lower for CB compared with all other positions ( P<0.05); W and S displayed the highest VHIA ( P<0.05). Relationships between match running performance and physical capacities were position-dependent, with poor or non-significant correlations within FB, CB, MD and W (e. g., VHIA vs. VVam-eval: R=0.06 in FB) but large associations within 2 (nd)S and S positions (e. g., VHIA vs. VVam-eval: R=0.70 in 2 (nd)S). In highly trained young soccer players, the importance of fitness level as a determinant of match running performance should be regarded as a function of playing position.

Game-based training in young elite handball players

M. Buchheit - specific HB training

pdf: M. Buchheit – specific HB training (ECSS 2008)

Poster BUCHHEIT - Spe HBT

pdf: Poster BUCHHEIT – Spe HBT – Coaching & Sport Science journal 2008

Game-based training in young elite handball players.

Source

Faculté des sciences du sport, Laboratoire de Recherche EA-3300: Adaptations Physiologiques à l’Exercice et Réadaptation à l’Effort, Amiens, France. martin.buchheit@u-picardie.fr

Abstract

This study compared the effect of high-intensity interval training (HIT) versus specific game-based handball training (HBT) on handball performance parameters. Thirty-two highly-trained adolescents (15.5+/-0.9 y) were assigned to either HIT (n=17) or HBT (n=15) groups, that performed either HIT or HBT twice per week for 10 weeks. The HIT consisted of 12-24 x 15 s runs at 95% of the speed reached at the end of the 30-15 Intermittent Fitness Test (V(IFT)) interspersed with 15 s passive recovery, while the HBT consisted of small-sided handball games performed over a similar time period. Before and after training, performance was assessed with a counter movement jump (CMJ), 10 m sprint time (10 m), best (RSAbest) and mean (RSAmean) times on a repeated sprint ability (RSA) test, the V(IFT) and the intermittent endurance index (iEI). After training, RSAbest (-3.5+/-2.7%), RSAmean (-3.9+/-2.2%) and V(IFT) (+6.3+/-5.2%) were improved (P<0.05), but there was no difference between groups. In conclusion, both HIT and HBT were found to be effective training modes for adolescent handball players. However, HBT should be considered as the preferred training method due to its higher game-based specificity.