Ground travel-induced impairment in wellness is associated with fitness and travel distance in young soccer players

Rabbani, Alireza  and Buchheit Martin. Ground travel-induced impairment in wellness is associated with fitness and travel distance in young soccer players. Kinesiology, In press.

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Abstract

The aims of this study were to 1) investigate the influence of ground travel on wellness measures, and 2) examine the possible influence of travel distance and fitness on the magnitude of these possible changes. Compared with home matches, wellness measures showed moderate–to-large impairments for away matches the day prior to the match (D-1) (range; +5 to 68%, (90%CL 1-88); standardized difference: range; +0.6 to +1.75 (0.1-2.07)) and small-to-large impairments the day of the match (D0, range; +7 to +68.1(-1.6-87.5); standardized difference, range; +0.24 to 1.78, (-0.06-2.15)), respectively. There were large and very large negative relationships between the increases of fatigue (r = -0.84, 90%CL -0.95; -0.56) or soreness at D-1 (r = -0.80, -0.93; -0.84) and players’ fitness. There were also very large positive correlations between actual wellness measures and traveling distance to away locations (r range; 0.70 to 87). Ground travel-induced impairment in wellness is associated with fitness and distance of away locations in young soccer players. Simple wellness questionnaires could be used to effectively monitor young soccer players’ freshness and readiness to train or compete during away games.

Key words: association football; fatigue; psychometric measures; monitoring; home advantage.

@alirezarabbani

Does short-duration heat exposure at a matched cardiovascular intensity improve intermittent running performance in a cool environment?

 

Calvin P. Philp, Martin Buchheit, Cecilia M. Kitic, Christopher T. Minson, James W. Fell. Does short-duration heat exposure at a matched cardiovascular intensity improve intermittent running performance in a cool environment? IJSPP, In press.

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ABSTRACT

Purpose: To investigate whether a five-day cycling training block in the heat (35°C) in Australian rules footballers was superior to exercising at the same relative intensity in cool conditions (15°C) for improving intermittent running performance in a cool environment (<18°C).

Methods: Using a parallel-group design, 12 semi-professional football players performed five days of cycling exercise [70% heart rate reserve (HRR) for 45 min (5 x 50 min sessions in total)] in a hot (HEAT, 35±1°C, 56±9% RH) or cool environment (COOL, 15±3°C, 81±10% RH). A 30-15 Intermittent Fitness Test to assess intermittent running performance (VIFT) was conducted in a cool environment (17±2°C, 58±5% RH) prior to, one and three days after the intervention.

Results: There was a likely small increase in VIFT within each group [HEAT: 0.5±0.3 km.h-1, 1.5±0.8 x smallest worthwhile change (SWC); COOL 0.4±0.4 km.h-1, 1.6±1.2 x SWC] three days post the intervention, with no difference in change between the groups (0.5±1.9%, 0.4±1.4 x SWC). Cycle power output during the intervention was almost certainly lower in the HEAT group (HEAT 1.8±0.2 W.kg-1 vs. COOL 2.5±0.3 W.kg-1, -21.7±3.2 x SWC, 100/0/0).

Conclusions: This study indicates that when cardiovascular exercise intensity is matched (i.e. 70% HRR) between environmental conditions, there is no additional performance benefit from short-duration moderate-intensity heat exposure (5 x 50 min) for semi-professional footballers exercising in cool conditions. However, the similar positive adaptations may occur in the HEAT with 30% lower mechanical load, which may be of interest for load management during intense training or rehabilitation phases.

Key Words: heat acclimation; football; plasma volume; relative-intensity exercise, VIFT

@cp_philp 

@ChrisMinson